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Success and duration of therapy


The success and duration of therapy for everyone is different. Healing is a process, not an occurrence. How much time it takes for a person to get healed is very individual.

Generally, we can say that the success of therapy depends on several factors:

  • The difficulty of the problem - whether a person has physical or emotional problems, or what the environment and circumstances are a person currently in, whether is he/she alone in the problem or have the support of another person, how long the problem lasts, etc.
  • The motivation of the client and the goals he/she wants to achieve - personal desire to heal and improve his/her situation is the most important factor in the success of therapy. Without taking responsibility for your life, your condition and your problems there is no healing. Depending on the goals a person wants to achieve, the duration of the therapy can be shorter or longer - whether a person only wants to relieve the existing symptoms and improve the current condition, or want a thorough change, growth, and development.
  • The expertise and quality of the therapist - the work and life experience of the therapist and his / her motivation and desire to help clients, as well as empathy and love for people and all living beings generally also play a role.
  • Therapist's Techniques and Methods - it is important individually to select techniques and methods that the therapist uses in his work. Not every technique is good for everyone, so the same (similar) problem for different persons can be done with different techniques, in many ways depending on the client's current needs and his/her openness to a specific method.

Depending on all of these factors, therapy may last from one, two, three treatments/sessions up to several months or years.

My desire is that the client gets better as quick as possible and that the therapy lasts as short as possible, and later if the client wants further growth and development, it can be extended according to the client's wishes and needs.

I work in a way to enable the client all the "self-help tools" so that he/she can help and rely on himself/herself as much as possible. I do not want to create an addictive relationship - it's not the goal of therapy.

True work is what the client is doing in his daily life - actively taking responsibility for his or her life by applying techniques, advice, and insights obtained through the therapy.